Giraffes are beautiful and unique animals belonging to the most important members of the animal kingdom in Africa. Unfortunately, the giraffe population is continuously decreasing and stopping this decline is unsuccessful. The giraffe population has decreased by up to 40 percent over the past three decades. In recent years, the decline is so severe that officials at theĀ U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceĀ have decided to put giraffes on the endangered species list.

It is a long process to officially get giraffes on the list of endangered species. Therefore, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has launched an investigation to determine the current status of the giraffe populace. The International Union for Conservation of Nature labelled giraffes as “vulnerable” in 2016.

The reason for the decrease in the giraffe population

As you have probably guessed, the main reason for the decrease in the giraffe population is poaching. Giraffe bones, skin and meat are in high demand and the reason why these animals are shot on a mass scale. The development of agriculture, resulting in a loss of the natural environment and food may also be responsible for the decrease in the giraffe population. Last but not least, diseases and low population dynamics, which lead to genetic isolation and poorer survival rates, are also to blame for the decrease in the giraffe population.

Why is it important to put giraffes on the endangered species list?

It is very important to realize when the population of any species is at risk of becoming extinct in time. Putting species on the endangered species list in time may in turn help to protect them. An endangered species is an organism that faces a high risk of extinction in the wild. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 is a law protecting endangered species from becoming extinct. Since the law’s inception, it has had a 99 percent success rate, meaning 99 percent of organisms that were named endangered, have not gone extinct.

Source: CNN, BBC, greenmatters.com/p/giraffes-endangered-species